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2 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

"How beautifully leaves grow old. How full of light and color are their last days."
~ John Burroughs (American naturalist and writer)

(Below: Enjoying the splendor of an autumn afternoon among Japanese Maples at the Hanselman Landscape Nursery)

Joyfully shared by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife

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2 months ago

GARDEN VIEWS IN AUTUMN:

A radiant 'Dancing Peacock' Maple waltzes merrily against an azure sky.

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2 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

72 SEASONS OF THE YEAR?

Here in the Northeast, we observe four seasons and either celebrate or rue the seasonal changes that dictate our wardrobe, our activities, and our house and garden projects. In Japan, however, the traditional Japanese calendar divides the year into 24 major divisions which are each split again into three for a total of 72 kō (or micro-seasons) that last around five days each.

In their present form, these 72 "seasons" offer a poetic journey through the Japanese year, exemplifying a culture infused with deep sensitivity and appreciation for the nuances of nature. Inspiring me to walk through each day with senses wide open to the wonders around me, here are a few of the beautifully lyrical descriptions of Japan's seasonal changes:

Spring wind thaws the ice
Brush warbler starts singing in the mountains
First Cherry blossoms
Distant thunder
Wild geese fly north
Bamboo shoots sprout
Rotten grass becomes fireflies
Hawks learn to fly
Evening cicadas sing
Maple and Ivy turn yellow
North wind blows leaves from the trees

Gratefully shared by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife
from: http://www.nippon.com/en/features/h00124/ and http://www.kurashikata.com/72seasons/

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2 months ago

"I'm so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers."
~ L. M. Mongomery (in Anne of Green Gables)

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3 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

SAY "HELLO" TO A FRIENDLY NATIVE: SERVICEBERRY (Amelanchier spp.)

Several months ago, I was delighted to discover that we have several of these friendly natives in residence on our property. My father had been reminiscing about our family's camping trip across western Canada during my college years. At one of our campsites, my father recalled, we picked "Saskatoon" berries and added them to pancakes. In response, my husband noted that the Saskatoon (also called Pacific or western Serviceberry) is a relative of the eastern Serviceberry trees we have in our garden! He mentioned that they are also called Juneberries, because they happen to produce fruit in June.

What was I waiting for?!? It was June and, to my great joy, our Serviceberry trees were laden with luscious blueberry look-alikes that were quickly picked and stirred into some pretty amazing pancakes the next morning! (See July 3, 2017 post.)

My fascination with this recent discovery keeps growing! Apparently, this native plant has more than 20 varieties with an interesting assortment of names (based on location, which fish are spawning when the flowers bloom, and all sorts of fun asides!): Pacific Serviceberry, Sarvisberry, Shadbush, Sugarplum, Indian Pear, May Cherry, Juneberry, Saskatoon, and (my favorite) Chuckley Pear, to name a few. Of special interest to gardeners are the four-season attractions of Serviceberry plants--a profusion of lacy white blossoms in early spring, delicious berries in summer (sure to attract birds and grandchildren!), stunning fall color, and striking silver-gray bark in winter.

While the other features of the Serviceberry plant are appealing, throughout history the main attraction has been its tasty berries. Early Native Americans combined serviceberries with dried meat to make pemmican; today's gardeners are baking them into pies, puddings or muffins, dehydrating them to eat like raisins, making them into jams, ice cream, and juices, or, as I am re-discovering, mixing them into pancakes. What fun to discover a native plant in our garden that can be enjoyed in so many ways!

Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife (& garden berry enthusiast)

Photo credits:
Blossoms and berries--Courtesy of Mt. Cuba Center, a "living collection of native and historic plants" in Hockessin, DE (http://mtcubacenter.org)
Serviceberry plants in spring and fall--Courtesy of The Honeytree Nursery (www.thehoneytreenursery.com)

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3 months ago

"My garden is a place that nurtures quiet in the midst of noise and makes it safe to listen to bird song and bee buzz and the trickle of water."
~Emilie Barnes (Time Began in a Garden)

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3 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

COLOR YOUR WORLD!

Snow-white clouds scudding across skies of intense blue; Goldenrods dancing in the afternoon sunshine to the tempo of a gentle breeze; fuzzy orange Wooly Bears scuttling across roadways . . . . Nature is hinting that autumn is just around the corner. And soon, God will flick His paintbrush and splashes of orange, red, and gold will appear on hillsides, in meadows, in our own gardens. Without a doubt, autumn will be here in all of her radiant splendor and we will be wishing that October lasted five months instead of just one!

I have an idea for prolonging the colors of autumn for at least one more month: This October, when the trees in your garden or a nearby park are flaunting their colors, pack a picnic lunch, rally the kids (or grandkids), and head outside for a leaf-collecting adventure. Bring home the leaves you gather and place them between the pages of the phone books you keep forgetting to recycle. In November, as you set your Thanksgiving table, bring out the leaves and scatter them across your table for a spectacular second showing of autumn's extravagant colors!

(The leaves on the phone book shown below are about 12 years old and still look amazing!)

--Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife (& avid leaf collector)

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3 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

"In the garden I tend to drop my thoughts here and there. To the flowers I whisper the secrets I keep and the hopes I breathe. I know they are there to eavesdrop for the angels."
~Dodinsky (Contemporary inspirational writer)

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4 months ago
National Geographic

Apparently this is what a hummingbird does in a hurricane . . . or at least, in the rain! Thank you, National Geographic, for capturing this beauty and sharing it with us!

Using a high-speed, high-resolution camera, photographer Anand Varma captures what the naked eye can't see.

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4 months ago
Hummingbird hymn

"And here are the hummingbirds, humming a hymn to the morning . . . . It is time for hummingbirds to leave the island. It is the end of another summer. It is time to reset the clock from the rise and fall of the tide, to the come and go of the school bus. It is a time of quiet wonder -- for wondering, for instance: Where do hummingbirds go in a hurricane?"
~ Robert McCloskey (from Time of Wonder, one of our family's favorite read-alouds)

Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife (& hummingbird enthusiast)

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