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4 months ago

A PRAYER FOR PEACE ON THIS DAY OF REMEMBRANCE . . .

Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy.

O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love; For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying that we are born again to eternal life.
~Attributed to Saint Francis of Assisi

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4 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

FALL IS FOR . . . FERTILIZING?

Most people fertilize their lawns in spring, but did you know that late fall is actually the best time to perform this task? Fall fertilization will help your lawn recover from summer stress and prepare for next year's growth. According to researchers and turf grass practitioners, "the application of nitrogen fertilizers in late fall results in lawns that are visibly greener in color through the summer of the following year . . . ." (http://www.greenviewfertilizer.com)

Applying nitrogen fertilizer to lawns during the the late season months of September through December--while the grass is still green and growing--provides several benefits not realized by spring and summer fertilization:
1. Better fall and winter color;
2. Earlier spring green-up;
3. Increased shoot density;
4. Improved fall, winter, and spring root growth;
5. Enhanced storage of energy reserves (carbohydrates) within the turf plant.

Researchers and turf grass experts find these advantage far outweigh the disadvantages (greater chance of snow mold injury and decreased cold tolerance), and heartily recommend fall application of nitrogen fertilizers to lawns.

To give your lawn the advantages of fall fertilization, call us today to schedule a visit (717-653-1273). Sean will be happy to come out and give your lawn a healthy head start!

Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife (& green-lawn endorser)

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4 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

BAREFOOT DAYS

In the morning, very early,
That's the time I love to go
Barefoot where the fern grows curly
And grass is cool between each toe,
On a summer morning--O!
On a summer morning!

That is when the birds go by
Up the sunny slopes of air,
And each rose has a butterfly
Or a golden bee to wear;
And I am glad in every toe--
Such a summer morning--O!
Such a summer morning!
~Rachel Field

Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife
**This treasured poem from my childhood was resurrected in my memory by James' photo showing the sun-streaked "slopes of air" early on a summer morning-O!

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5 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

A RETURN TO PARADISE (Part 6)
Plan for the Long Term

When seeking to restore Eden in your back yard, James Hanselman cautions against quick fixes: “In garden planning and budgeting, it is wise to invest in a well-thought-through, long-term plan. Impulsive projects often need to be redone in a few years, if a larger theme is not considered.” He states, “A garden plan that prioritizes suitability, elegance, and sustainability will prevent wasted effort and provide so much more enjoyment over time."

The area showcased below was developed to its current beauty by Hanselman Landscape for clients in Manheim who originally bought a home with an uninspiring pool. Hanselman explains: “Our clients asked if we could build a pool for their grandkids with a swim-in waterfall that resembled one they had seen on a trip to Central America. These photos (below) show the fulfillment of their dreams. They only wish they had done it sooner!"

Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife (& grateful beneficiary of long-term commitment)

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5 months ago
Timeline Photos

"Do not waste time dreaming of great faraway opportunities; do the best you can where you are. Open your petals of power and beauty and fling out the fragrance of your life in the place that has been assigned to you."
~ Orison Swett Marden (1848-1924, American inspirational author and founder of SUCCESS magazine)

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5 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

"What a psalm the storm was singing, and how fresh the smell of the washed earth and leaves, and how sweet the still small voices of the storm."
~ John Muir (1838-1914, Scottish-American naturalist, author and early advocate of wilderness preservation)

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5 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

TAKE A FOREST BATH; IT'S GOOD FOR YOU!

Shinrin-yoku, or "forest bathing" was developed in Japan during the 1980s and has become a cornerstone of preventive health care and healing in Japanese medicine. Also referred to as forest therapy, Shinrin-yoku means "taking in the forest atmosphere" or simply "being with trees".

Since the appreciation of nature has long been a national pastime in Japan, the Japanese didn't need to be persuaded that "forest bathing" was a good idea. Nevertheless, Japan spent about $4 million dollars studying the physiological and psychological effects of forest bathing. In a 2009 study, Qing Li, a professor at Nippon Medical School in Tokyo, measured the activity of human natural killer (NK) cells in the immune system of his subjects before and after exposure to the woods. NK cells provide rapid responses to viral-infected cells and tumor formation, and are associated with immune system health and cancer prevention. Following weekend forest visits, Li’s subjects showed significant increases in NK cell activity in the week after a forest visit, with positive effects lasting a month. These results are due to various essential oils, generally called phytoncide, which trees emit to protect themselves from germs and insects.
Forest air doesn’t just feel fresher and healthier—inhaling phytoncide actually seems to improve immune system function!

At Hanselman Landscape, we understand the therapeutic value of "being with trees" and encourage you to create a haven of trees and shrubs around your home so you can take a "forest bath" anytime! CONTACT US! We'd love to help make this invigorating experience a daily reality for you!

Contributed by Betty Hanselman
Gardener's wife (& frequent "forest bather")

Based on an article by Ephrat Livini
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/03/the-japanese-practice-of-forest-bathing-is-scientificially-proven-to-be-good-for-you/

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6 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

"Aaah, summer - that long anticipated stretch of lazy, lingering days, free of responsibility and rife with possibility. It's a time to hunt for insects, master handstands, practice swimming strokes, conquer trees, explore nooks and crannies, and make new friends."
~ Darell Hammond

At Hanselman Landscape, it is our joy to build gardens "rife with possibility" and ready for exploration! Call us (717-653-1273). We would love to bring a little bit of childhood imagination and delight into your daily experience!

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6 months ago
Timeline Photos

Morning light shines into the restoring woodland garden.
#enchantedforest

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6 months ago
Photos from Hanselman Landscape's post

A PLACE TO BREATHE . . .

"Standing in my garden, breathing in deep and sweet, I realize how often I seem to be holding my breath. So much of our urban air is noxious, thick. What a relief to find a place where the trees and plants have helped to cleanse the air, where taking a deep breath feels safe and pleasurable.

But this is not just a matter of breathing cleaner air. It's about finding a place where it's safe to feel. So much about modern living assaults our senses. We're buffeted by bad news, harangued with hurry . . . until we unconsciously pull down our awareness levels like blinds on a too-bright window. No wonder we forget to breathe deeply. No wonder we become half-blind, hard-of-hearing . . . hardened to the point that we can discern only the harshest of realities.

But the garden is a safe place to reverse the hardening process, to become more conversant with realities that are no less valid for being softer and more beautiful. The garden is a place of tenderness, of freshness, of joy and delight. The triumphs and sorrows here are on the scale of centuries, grounded in the eternal rhythms of the earth. Here I find . . . my numbed senses coming alive again."

~ Emilie Barnes in Time Began in a Garden

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